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Lung Cancer

Tobacco Cessation & Lung Cancer Prevention

Tobacco cessation greatly reduces the risk for developing lung cancer. American Indian and Alaska Native people have the highest smoking rate in the nation, but more than half of smokers want to quit. Take action and talk to your health care provider about what options work best for you on your quitting journey.

Tobacco Cessation Your path to quitting – support and resources

Lung Cancer Screening

Lung Cancer Screening

Lung cancer screening can save lives by finding cancer before it's deadly. You can use our resource to see if you might be eligible for screening, then talk to your doctor about whether it's right for you.

Smoking Motivations Media Package

Developed in collaboration with the Native Health News Alliance is a video of successful quitters sharing their stories.

Lungs are important. Breathing is sacred. Lung Cancer Awareness

Join AICAF each November to celebrate Lung Cancer Awareness Month (LCAM). Our mission during this campaign is to increase awareness of lung health across Indian Country, and encourage our families to keep traditional tobacco sacred in Native communities. Use our LCAM Flyer to learn more about our events, resources and ways to engage throughout the month.

Use AICAF's Lung Cancer Awareness Month (LCAM) Social Media Toolkit to engage community members, public health professionals and leaders working towards cancer equity in raising awareness of lung health in Native communities. This toolkit includes sample social media posts that can easily be copied and pasted into the platform of your choice.

Lung Cancer Signs & Symptoms

Use the Lung Cancer Signs & Symptoms resource to learn about the warning signs of lung disease, and to help you understand when you should get screened. Talk to your doctor right away if you experience any of these symptoms.

Download our blank version of the Lung Cancer Signs & Symptoms resource, then fill in the space with your tribe's word for "breathing." Share your completed copy with AICAF on social media using #SacredBreath!

E-Cigarettes are Not Our Tradition

Use this infographic to learn about the different types of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) and understand their safety for youth and our communities. The resource also provides guidance for parents of youth who are thinking about quitting e-cigarettes.

Say No to Commercial Tobacco Youth Meme Contest

AICAF is excited to engage with our families across Indian Country during Lung Cancer Awareness Month (LCAM) by hosting the Say No to Commercial Tobacco Meme Contest. We invite youth ages 13-17 to participate by creating an original meme that highlights our LCAM campaign’s mission to keep traditional tobacco sacred and promote lung health in our communities. View the contest details for guidelines and instructions for how to submit your meme. 

iQuit! Toolkit

The iQuit! Toolkit was driven by a research project focused on increasing the use of the 5A’s and increasing quit attempts, as well as the use of quit aids such as medication, nicotine replacement therapy, and/or referrals to additional services in tribal and urban American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) health care systems. The Toolkit assists Native health care systems and health and human service departments in developing and implementing system changes to address commercial tobacco addiction in their communities.

More Resources

Future Generations Lobby Banner

This large (7' X 2.5') sign can be used in clinic lobbies to get patients started thinking about cessation before they even see a health care worker. They can also be used at community events and are very portable.

Medication Table

This medication table can be posted in clinical settings as a way to encourage shared decision-making between providers and patients. The charts describe the various cessation medications available.

5 A's Flow Chart

This chart can serve as an example of how to use the 5 A’s.

Fagerstrom’s Test of Nicotine Dependence

These table-top resources can be displayed in waiting areas and exam rooms and used to discuss addiction with smokers.